Our Dental Services

Cleaning and Prevention

Professional teeth cleanings are very important to your dental health and a key component of preventative dental care. Daily oral hygiene practices combined with professional cleanings help to prevent cavities, enamel wear and gum disease. Dental visits focus on the removal of plaque, tartar buildup and tooth stains to keep your mouth and gums healthy. They also give your dentist a chance to examine your mouth to make sure all is well.

Types of cleaning and prevention procedures include

Digital X-Rays

Fluoride treatment

Oral cancer exam

Oral hygiene aids

Gum care

Infection control

Panoramic X-rays

Sealants

Dental exams and cleanings

Dental X-rays

Our Dental Services

Cleaning and Prevention

Professional teeth cleanings are very important to your dental health and a key component of preventative dental care. Daily oral hygiene practices combined with professional cleanings help to prevent cavities, enamel wear and gum disease. Dental visits focus on the removal of plaque, tartar buildup and tooth stains to keep your mouth and gums healthy. They also give your dentist a chance to examine your mouth to make sure all is well.

Types of cleaning and prevention procedures include

Digital X-Rays

Fluoride treatment

Oral cancer exam

Oral hygiene aids

Gum care

Infection control

Panoramic X-rays

Sealants

Dental exams and cleanings

Dental X-rays

Dental X-rays

Dental X-rays are radiographic images which give your providers the ability to access information that may not be able to be seen with the naked eye. They provide insight into whether you have impacted teeth and hidden decay. They are used to examine the condition of previous dental work. Tumors, cysts and abscesses can be located in X-rays. In terms of preventing tooth loss, they alert your dentist to bone loss from periodontal disease and signify whether there is enough bone for the placement of dental implants. To protect patients from radiation, patients are covered with a lead apron and high-speed film is used. It is a safe and relatively quick process.

Fluoride Treatment

Fluoride is used to protect the teeth from cavities, by strengthening tooth enamel. Treatment is applied through the topical delivery of fluoride to the teeth. To perform the procedure, your dentist will fill teeth trays with Fluoride solution, and have you bite down on the trays for several minutes. Fluoride is a natural mineral; A milder concentration of Fluoride is commonly found in toothpaste and is also inserted into public water systems, to reduce the occurrence of tooth decay. This mineral has no flavor or odors and repairs damage to the teeth by bonding to teeth and making them stronger.

Oral Cancer Exam

Oral cancer examinations are performed by your dentist to look for signs of precancerous or cancerous conditions. Screenings for oral cancer are performed during your routine dental visits. Your dentist will look at the inside of your mouth to check for unusual growths or sores. Your dentist will also use their hands on the outside of your mouth to the feel for any abnormalities in the surrounding tissues, such as lumps or painful areas. The goal of an oral cancer screening is to identify mouth cancer in its early stages. As with all forms of cancer, early detection leads to greater chances of a cure.

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Oral Hygiene Aids

Oral hygiene aids are the tools used in the mouth to remove food particles and plaque and to prevent tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath. Plaque contains harmful bacteria; it must be removed daily to stop problems from forming. Oral hygiene aids are the tools you use at home to remove plaque and other destructive particles. Toothbrushes and dental floss are the primary tools for this process. Tongue cleaners, mouthwashes and oral irrigators are other commonly used household items which promote daily care. These oral aids work together with your twice yearly professional dental cleanings to treat and prevent oral health issues.

Gum Care

Excellent oral health starts with gum care but it is often overlooked. It’s important to understand how your gums play a part in the health of your mouth. Plaque buildup eventually leads to receding gum lines, bone loss, and even tooth loss in severe cases. Gum disease is painless during its early stages so issues can go undetected until it becomes too late. If proper hygiene techniques are utilized early, the damage caused by diseases such as Gingivitis are reversible. Daily brushing and flossing and regular visits to the dentist help to keep plaque and bacteria at bay and keep your gums healthy and happy.

Infection control

Infection control procedures are precautions taken in dental care settings to prevent the spread of disease. Special recommendations have been created by the Centers for Disease Control for use in dental offices. All surfaces must be decontaminated before a patient enters the exam room. Items such as dental tools are sterilized between patients. Needles and disposable tools are discarded after a single use. Dental care staff wear gloves, masks, gowns and protective glasses while working with patients. Before seeing the next patient, the dental care team must wash their hands and put on a fresh pair of gloves. These procedures are put in place to protect both the patient and staff against infection.

Panoramic X-rays

Panoramic radiography captures the entire mouth in a single image, to include the teeth, gums, jaws and tissues. The jaw is curved in a shape similar to that of a horseshoe; however, this special type of X-ray produces a flat image. Members of your dental care team perform these X-rays in everyday use. They are used for treatment planning purposes, such as preparing for dentures or braces. They are also used in diagnostic examinations, to identify issues and create an effective treatment plan.

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Sealants

A dental sealant is a thin plastic coating that’s bonded into the grooves of a tooth, to offer protection against tooth decay. Grooves are located on the chewing surfaces of teeth, which are common areas for wear and tear, due to frequent use. The coating that’s used is either clear or white, so as to blend in with the natural color of your teeth. Although daily oral hygiene practices will remove plaque and food particles from your teeth, they cannot always thoroughly clean the tiny crevices of your back teeth, or molars. Children and adolescents are also great candidates for sealants because their teeth are prone to cavities. Sealants can help to protect their teeth as their teeth develop and mature.

Dental Exams and Cleanings

The dental examination is a process during which your dentist will investigate many aspects of your oral health in order to pinpoint abnormalities or concerns. From this examination, an individualized treatment plan is formulated to help you meet your goals and to optimize your oral health care. Dental cleanings are an opportunity for your dental hygienist to rid your teeth and gums of harmful plaque and bacteria. Cleanings consist of diagnostic and preventative care, as well as educational information for your continued benefit. Examples of diagnostic services include: evaluation of your gum tissue, X-rays of your mouth, and checking your bite patterns. Preventative services focus on the removal of plaque and tartar and strengthening your teeth through a variety of treatments. Education may include tobacco-cessation counseling, brushing and flossing instructions and recommendations for future treatment.

Digital X-rays

Digital X-rays are an exciting advancement in the field of dental technology because of the added benefits they provide over traditional X-rays. They are also environmentally friendly. As digital images don’t require any harsh chemicals for processing, once they are exposed, they can be sent directly to a computer and viewed immediately. Copies of your digital images can be sent to you and your insurance company electronically, eliminating the need for printed paper copies. These digital images may be obtained in several ways: One method places an electronic sensor in the mouth to record images. An indirect technique uses an X-ray film scanner to view traditional dental X-rays as digital images. The last option is to combine the previous two techniques to convert dental X-rays into digital film.